Quantcast

Zbigniew Brzezinski

LordOpie

MOTHER HEN
Oct 17, 2002
21,033
1
Denver
I'd like us to discuss this in as much detail as we monkeys can.

I'll be honest, I didn't know about PNAC until 2001 despite their very accessible documents back to 1997. Anyone in the know should've been screaminga about PNAC during the primaries and run to PotUS, yet I heard nothing.

So far, my little googling suggests that Brzezinski is for:
-- a world govt.
-- slower, more subtle methods of "invasion"... planting people at high levels of govt, supporting internal rebellions and the like (see Shah, Iran, 1970s; see also Al-Qaeda, support to over-throw Russia)


I'm not saying these things are good or bad, just are. In fact, if we are going to try to influence global politics, I prefer these methods over Bush & Iraq. Except, of course, that Brzezinski, et al. via the Carter Admin created our biggest "enemy" today.

So, please post what you learn :)

I’m not going to say that Obama is ready for car bombs or anything, but there is a lot more to him than meets the average persons’ eyes.

If you’re an Obama fan right now, you should know all about his up bringing and the guy that currently advises him Zbigniew Brzezinski.


That guy is fvcked, and people should know who the hell their actually voting for.

I previously posted his name and not one of Obama’s fans has commented?
 

N8 v2.0

Not the sharpest tool in the shed
Oct 18, 2002
11,007
149
The Cleft of Venus
meh.. advisors come and go.. i dont see any reason to care much about this guy.

Although he could change his name to Tom Smith and no one would even notice him.
 

syadasti

i heart mac
Apr 15, 2002
12,721
290
VT
Except, of course, that Brzezinski, et al. via the Carter Admin created our biggest "enemy" today.
That program spanned both the Carter and Reagan Admin and Reagan admired the Mujahideen publically calling them, "freedom fighters"
 

LordOpie

MOTHER HEN
Oct 17, 2002
21,033
1
Denver
That program spanned both the Carter and Reagan Admin and Reagan admired the Mujahideen publically calling them, "freedom fighters"
Correct.

I'm not saying Brzezinski created our enemy. I'm just saying that we lacked the necessary vision (or ignored it) to see that our "friend" would "turn" on us... for whatever reasons.


I keep googling and am not finding anything negative about the guy. Please help.
 

Plummit

Monkey
Mar 12, 2002
233
0
Clip w/ Zbigniew from the Daily Show in March.

From CNN's "Knowledge Bank"

Zbigniev Kazimierz Brzezinski

Born on March 28, 1928, in Warsaw, Poland, the future national security adviser to President Carter and son of a Polish diplomat spent part of his youth in France and Germany before moving to Canada. He received a B.A. and M.A. in political science from McGill University, in 1949 and 1950 respectively, and in 1953 earned his doctorate in political science from Harvard. He taught at Harvard before moving to Columbia University in 1961 to head the new Institute on Communist Affairs. In 1958 he became a U.S. citizen. During the 1960s Brzezinski acted as an adviser to Kennedy and Johnson administration officials. Generally taking a hard line on policy toward the Soviet Union, he was also an influential force behind the Johnson administration's "bridge-building" ideas regarding Eastern Europe. During the final years of the Johnson administration, he was a foreign policy adviser to Vice President Hubert Humphrey and his presidential campaign.

In 1973, Brzezinski became the first director of the Trilateral Commission, a group of prominent political and business leaders and academics from the United States, Western Europe and Japan. Its purpose was to strengthen relations among the three regions. Future President Carter was a member, and when he declared his candidacy for the White House in 1974, Brzezinski, a critic of the Nixon-Kissinger foreign policy style, became his adviser on foreign affairs. After his victory in 1976, Carter made Brzezinski national security adviser.

Aiming to replace Kissinger's "acrobatics" in foreign policy-making with a foreign policy "architecture," Brzezinski was as eager for power as his rival. However, his task was complicated by his focus on East-West relations, and in a hawkish way -- in an administration where many cared a great deal about North-South relations and human rights. On the whole, Brzezinski was a team player. He emphasized the further development of the U.S.-China relationship, favored a new arms control agreement with Moscow and shared the president and Secretary of State Cyrus Vance's view that the United States should seek international cooperation in its diplomacy instead of going it alone. In the growing crisis atmosphere of 1979 and 1980 due to the Iranian hostage situation, the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan and a deepening economic crisis, Brzezinski's anti-Soviet views gained influence but could not end the Carter administration's malaise. Since his time in government, Brzezinski has been active as a writer, teacher and consultant.
And from Wikipedia, judge for yourself what this last link is worth.

Intentionally omitted: any and all references to or links from Alex Jones' "Prison Planet," Tri-Lateral commission paranoia, and general fear mongering/ conspiracy theories.
 

skinny mike

Turbo Monkey
Jan 24, 2005
6,416
0
-- slower, more subtle methods of "invasion"... planting people at high levels of govt, supporting internal rebellions and the like (see Shah, Iran, 1970s; see also Al-Qaeda, support to over-throw Russia)
the us has been doing this in latin america since the start of the cold war.
 

Plummit

Monkey
Mar 12, 2002
233
0
I appreciate your post, but you said nothing.
And you said in your original post
So, please post what you learn
And I did, posting what I'd learned about Brzezinski during a quick google search. If you're looking for negatives about the guy, it seems like you'll likely end up w/ a lot of paranoid "Tri-lateral Commission" conspiracy theories or criticism of Al Quaeda's growth out of the U.S. supported Afghan Mujahadeen resistance to Soviet Occupation. As has been pointed out, there are enough issues, viewpoints and "blame" surrounding this last one to go around.
 

LordOpie

MOTHER HEN
Oct 17, 2002
21,033
1
Denver
And I did, posting what I'd learned about Brzezinski during a quick google search.
I mean more than just basic history.

the us has been doing this in latin america since the start of the cold war.
Right, but was he involved in that?

taking just this bullet, i've learned is that he's a bit of a hypocrit through his handling of a proposed sidewalk in front of his house:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/04/08/AR2006040801133.html

needs to take a gander at geese is all i'm saying.
It's funny how he supports a Candidate of Change, but wants none in his neighborhood :)
 

ohio

The Fresno Kid
Nov 26, 2001
6,640
4
SF, CA
I mean more than just basic history.
Christ, Opie, you asked for info and said it was hard to find and he posted some really good stuff. I had none of that background and I'm assuming most didn't. Give the man a couple of hours at least to form an opinion.

I still don't understand why this guy is even an issue right now.
 

LordOpie

MOTHER HEN
Oct 17, 2002
21,033
1
Denver
Christ, Opie, you asked for info and said it was hard to find and he posted some really good stuff. I had none of that background and I'm assuming most didn't. Give the man a couple of hours at least to form an opinion.
WTF?

I'm happy to give him all the time he wants to form an opinion, but wiki comes up FIRST in the google search... are people NOT doing basic searches beforehand?

Take your time, go ahead, read up if you're interested, but copy-paste-posting is so n8.

I still don't understand why this guy is even an issue right now.
Simple, he's apparently a big player behind the scenes... shouldn't we learn about those who are advising?
 

Plummit

Monkey
Mar 12, 2002
233
0
Simple, he's apparently a big player behind the scenes... shouldn't we learn about those who are advising?
Since we're talking about advisers, here's a list of the foreign policy and national security advisers to the major candidates as of Oct 2, '07. I haven't been able to find a complete list with a more recent date. I guess my point in putting this out there is that the emphasis we seem to be giving Brzezinski is odd. He is one among many.

That said, he opposed the Iraq invasion, based, in part, on concerns that we would be seen as a galvanizing occupier, like the Soviets were in Afghanistan. The list is quoted and edited to reflect only the main candidates still in the race. My apologies the Huckafans. He wasn't considered a contender at the time this article was published. McCain's advisers in the next post
washingtonpost.com
Wednesday, October 2, 2007

A list of the national security and foreign policy advisers to the leading presidential candidates from both parties.
DEMOCRATS

Hillary Clinton

Madeleine K. Albright, President Clinton’s secretary of state and now chairperson of the National Democratic Institute, foreign policy adviser

Samuel R. Berger, President Clinton’s national security adviser and now a principal at business consultancy Stonebridge, foreign policy adviser

Lt. Gen. Daniel William Christman, a former West Point superintendent and now senior vice president for international affairs at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, foreign policy adviser

Gen. Wesley K. Clark, President Clinton’s Kosovo commander and now a Democratic fundraiser, endorsed Sen. Clinton Sept. 15

John H. Dalton, President Clinton’s Navy secretary and now president of the Financial Services Roundtable’s Housing Policy Council, veterans and military retirees for Hillary

Lee Feinstein, a deputy in President Clinton’s State Department, national security coordinator

Leslie H. Gelb; president emeritus of the Council on Foreign Relations, a former New York Times correspondent and a former State and Defense Department official, informal adviser

Richard C. Holbrooke, President Clinton’s UN ambassador and broker of the Dayton Peace Accords (and now a Washington Post columnist), foreign policy adviser

Martin S. Indyk, President Clinton’s ambassador to Israel and now director of Brookings’s Saban Center for Middle East Policy, foreign policy adviser

Gen. John M. ("Jack") Keane, a former Army vice chief of staff who co-crafted the Iraq "surge" and is now a military analyst (sometimes for ABC news), military issues adviser

Lt. Gen. Claudia J. Kennedy, former deputy chief of staff for intelligence, veterans and military retirees for Hillary

Lt. Gen. Donald L. Kerrick, President Clinton’s deputy national security adviser, organizes meetings of retired officers

Col. Andrew F. Krepinevich, president of the Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments, briefed Hillary Clinton as well as Sen. John McCain and Gov. Bill Richardson

Vali Nasr, Naval Postgraduate School professor, Middle East adviser

Michael O'Hanlon, Brookings senior fellow and former Congressional Budget Office defense and foreign policy analyst, supporter

Rep. (and retired Vice Adm.) Joseph Sestak, veterans and military retirees for Hillary

Andrew Shapiro, Sen. Clinton’s Senate foreign policy staffer

Jeffrey H. Smith, former CIA general counsel and now a partner leading the public policy and government contracts group of law firm Arnold & Porter, national security adviser

Strobe Talbott, Brookings president, informal adviser

Togo D. West, President Clinton’s secretary for veterans affairs and former secretary of the Army, veterans and military retirees for Hillary

Former Amb. Joseph C. Wilson IV, the half of the Plamegate couple who criticized the administration for using questionable evidence to promote the Iraq war, endorsed Sen. Clinton July 16

Barack Obama

Former Amb. Jeffrey Bader, President Clinton’s National Security Council Asia specialist and now head of Brookings’s China center, national security adviser

Mark Brzezinski, President Clinton’s National Security Council Southeast Europe specialist and now a partner at law firm McGuireWoods, national security adviser

Zbigniew Brzezinski, President Carter’s national security adviser and now a Center for Strategic and International Studies counselor and trustee and frequent guest on PBS’s NewsHour with Jim Lehrer, foreign policy adviser

Richard A. Clarke, President Clinton and President George W. Bush’s counterterrorism czar and now head of Good Harbor Consulting and an ABC News contributor, sometimes Obama adviser

Gregory B. Craig, State Department director of policy planning under President Clinton and now a partner at law firm Williams & Connolly, foreign policy adviser

Roger W. Cressey, former National Security Council counterterrorism staffer and now Good Harbor Consulting president and NBC News consultant, has advised Obama but says not exclusive

Ivo H. Daalder, National Security Council director for European affairs during President Clinton’s administration and now a Brookings senior fellow, foreign policy adviser

Richard Danzig, President Clinton’s Navy secretary and now a Center for Strategic and International Analysis fellow, national security adviser

Philip H. Gordon, President Clinton’s National Security Council staffer for Europe and now a Brookings senior fellow, national security adviser

Maj. Gen. J. (Jonathan) Scott Gration, a 32-year Air Force veteran and now CEO of Africa anti-poverty effort Millennium Villages, national security adviser and surrogate

Lawrence J. Korb, assistant secretary of defense from 1981-1985 and now a senior fellow at the Center for American Progress, informal foreign policy adviser

W. Anthony Lake, President Clinton’s national security adviser and now a professor at Georgetown’s school of foreign service, foreign policy adviser

James M. Ludes, former defense and foreign policy adviser to Sen. John Kerry, D-Mass., and now executive director of the American Security Project, national security adviser

Robert Malley, President Clinton’s Middle East envoy and now International Crisis Group’s Middle East and North Africa program director, national security adviser

Gen. Merrill A. ("Tony") McPeak, former Air Force chief of staff and now a business consultant, national security adviser

Denis McDonough, Center for American Progress senior fellow and former policy adviser to then-Senate Democratic Leader Tom Daschle, foreign policy coordinator

Samantha Power, Harvard-based human rights scholar and Pulitzer Prize winning writer, foreign policy adviser

Susan E. Rice, President Clinton’s Africa specialist at the State Department and National Security Council and now a Brookings senior fellow, foreign policy adviser

Bruce O. Riedel, former CIA officer and National Security Council staffer for Near East and Asian affairs and now a Brookings senior fellow, national security adviser

Dennis B. Ross, President Clinton’s Middle East negotiator and now a Washington Institute for Near East Policy fellow, Middle East adviser

Sarah Sewall, deputy assistant secretary of defense for peacekeeping and humanitarian assistance during President Clinton’s administration and now director of Harvard’s Carr Center for Human Rights Policy, national security adviser

Daniel B. Shapiro, National Security Council director for legislative affairs during President Clinton’s administration and now a lobbyist with Timmons & Company, Middle East adviser

Mona Sutphen, former aide to President Clinton’s National Security adviser Samuel R. Berger and to United Nations ambassador Bill Richardson and now managing director of business consultancy Stonebridge, national security adviser
 

Plummit

Monkey
Mar 12, 2002
233
0
McCain's advisers.

John McCain

Richard Lee Armitage, President George W. Bush’s deputy secretary of state and an international business consultant and lobbyist, informal foreign policy adviser

Bernard Aronson, former assistant secretary of state for inter-American affairs and now a managing partner of private equity investment company ACON Investments, informal foreign policy adviser

William L. Ball III, secretary of the Navy during President Reagan’s administration and managing director of lobbying firm the Loeffler Group, informal national security adviser

Stephen E. Biegun, former national security aide to then-Sen. Bill Frist, R-Tenn., and now Ford Motors vice president of international government affairs, informal national security adviser

Max Boot, Council on Foreign Relations editor and former Wall Street Journal editorial editor, foreign policy adviser

Brig. Gen. Tom Bruner, Iowa veterans advisory committee

Lorne W. Craner, International Republican Institute president, informal foreign policy adviser

Lawrence S. Eagleburger, President George H.W. Bush’s secretary of state and a senior public policy adviser with law firm Baker Donelson, endorsed McCain April 10

Brig. Gen. Russ Eggers, Iowa veterans advisory committee

Maj. Gen. Merrill Evans, Iowa veterans advisory committee

Niall Ferguson, Harvard historian and Hoover Institution senior fellow, informal foreign policy adviser

Michael J. Green, former Asia adviser to President George W. Bush and now Japan chair at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, Asia policy adviser

Gen. Alexander M. Haig, Jr., President Reagan’s secretary of state, endorsed McCain April 10

Maj. Gen. Evan "Curly" Hultman, Iowa veterans advisory committee

Robert Kagan; senior associate with the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, Washington Post columnist and former speechwriter for then-secretary of state George P. Shultz; informal foreign policy adviser

Brig. Gen. Robert Michael Kimmitt, current deputy Treasury secretary, informal national security adviser

Henry A. Kissinger, President Nixon and President Ford’s secretary of state who met McCain in Vietnam and is now a consultant, informal adviser

Col. Andrew F. Krepinevich, president of the Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments, briefed McCain as well as Sen. Hillary Clinton and Gov. Bill Richardson

William Kristol, The Weekly Standard editor, informal foreign policy adviser

Adm. Charles Larson, former superintendent of the U.S. Naval Academy and now chairman of consulting firm ViaGlobal Group, informal national security adviser

Robert "Bud" McFarlane, President Reagan’s national security adviser and now a principal with Energy & Communications Solutions, energy and national security adviser

Brig. Gen. Warren "Bud" Nelson, Iowa veterans advisory committee

Brig. Gen. Eddie Newman, Iowa veterans advisory committee

Maj. Gen. John Peppers, Iowa veterans advisory committee

Maj. Ralph Peters, writer and retired Army officer, informal national security adviser

Brig. Gen. Maurice Phillips, Iowa veterans advisory committee

Gen. Colin L. Powell, President George W. Bush’s secretary of state, informal foreign policy adviser

James R. Schlesinger, President Nixon and President Ford’s secretary of defense, energy and national security adviser

Randy Scheunemann, national security aide to then-Senate Majority Leaders Bob Dole and Trent Lott and now a lobbyist, defense and foreign policy coordinator (for this cycle and 2000)

Gary Schmitt, former staff director of the Senate Intelligence Committee and now an American Enterprise Institute scholar, foreign policy adviser

Lt. Gen. Brent Scowcroft, national security adviser to Presidents Ford and George H.W. Bush and founder of business consultancy the Scowcroft Group, adviser

George P. Shultz, President Reagan’s secretary of state and a Hoover Institution Fellow, endorsed McCain April 10

Brig. Gen. W.L. "Bill" Wallace, Iowa veterans advisory committee

Maj. Gen. Gary Wattnem, Iowa veterans advisory committee

R. James Woolsey, former CIA director and now a vice president at consulting company Booz Allen Hamilton, energy and national security adviser
 

LordOpie

MOTHER HEN
Oct 17, 2002
21,033
1
Denver
Since we're talking about advisers, here's a list of the foreign policy and national security advisers to the major candidates as of Oct 2, '07. I haven't been able to find a complete list with a more recent date. I guess my point in putting this out there is that the emphasis we seem to be giving Brzezinski is odd. He is one among many.
Extremely interesting and yes, he is one of many. Advisors should be in the public spotlight, at least more than they are.

For one thing, what little I've learned over the past five hours makes me MORE of an Obama supporter.
 

$tinkle

Expert on blowing
Feb 12, 2003
14,591
5
from what i can tell on the list of advisors:
- hillary's: ass-covering success at any cost
- obama's: well diversified
- mccain's: well qualified to invade iran
 

LordOpie

MOTHER HEN
Oct 17, 2002
21,033
1
Denver
- mccain's: well qualified to invade iran
I can believe that except for Gen. Colin L. Powell... didn't he basically quit the Bush Admin in frustration and hinted that he felt an invasion was 'wrong'?

If so, I can't imagine him joining McCain if McCain was going to invade -- which McCain has hinted at doing.

So, odd.
 

Silver

find me a tampon
Jul 20, 2002
10,848
0
Orange County, CA
Anyone who has William Kristol on his list of advisors isn't fit to run an outhouse.

edit: Unless the reason he's there is so that you do the opposite of what he thinks a good idea is, of course...
 

J-Dubs

Monkey
Jul 10, 2006
702
0
Salem, MA
I can believe that except for Gen. Colin L. Powell... didn't he basically quit the Bush Admin in frustration and hinted that he felt an invasion was 'wrong'?

If so, I can't imagine him joining McCain if McCain was going to invade -- which McCain has hinted at doing.

So, odd.

"Bomb bomb bomb, Bomb-bomb Iran..."
 

3D.

Monkey
Feb 23, 2006
899
0
Chinafornia USA
I sent a PM to "3D." in hopes of getting him to clarifying his concerns. Maybe he'll check in?
Yea I get it. It’s been a long day but I’m in…

You can like or dislike the people who surround obama… whatever

When zbig speaks of the current war in Iraq, he’s crystal clear on his positions. He makes extremely valid comments like:

“if the united states continues to be bogged down in a protracted bloody involvement in Iraq, the final destination on this downhill track is likely to be a head-on conflict with Iran and with much of the world of Islam at large”.(Zbig @ The Senate Foreign Relations Committee)

He makes strong points like:

“I personally view with great skepticism all this talk about us creating an Iraqi National Army, creating a nation, building, nation building and so forth. The problem is we have smashed this state; we have given an enormous opportunity for narrow sectarian interests and passions to rise” (Zbig)

He constantly displays the translucency of the Bush administration’s trickery by making statements like:

“Bush is talented in making things look simple” (Zbig)

What he is not showing clarity on is; his future “downhill track” we will be riding on in Pakistan & Afghanistan:

ABC News - Anti-War Obama Pushes Pakistan Invasion
Obama Delivers Bold Speech About War on Terror
Presidential Candidate Pushes Aggressive Stance Toward Pakistan
By Jake Tapper
8-1-7

In a strikingly bold speech about terrorism Wednesday, Democratic presidential candidate Illinois Sen. Barack Obama called not only for a withdrawal of U.S. troops from Iraq, but a redeployment of troops into Afghanistan and even Pakistan, with or without the permission of Pakistan President Pervez Musharraf.

"I understand that President Musharraf has his own challenges," Obama said, "but let me make this clear. There are terrorists holed up in those mountains who murdered 3,000 Americans. They are plotting to strike again. It was a terrible mistake to fail to act when we had a chance to take out an al Qaeda leadership meeting in 2005. If we have actionable intelligence about high-value terrorist targets and President Musharraf won't act, we will."

Obama's mention of an "al Qaeda leadership meeting" refers to a classified military operation planned in early 2005 to kill al Qaeda leaders including Osama bin Laden's top deputy Ayman al-Zawahri in Pakistan's tribal regions. First reported in The New York Times earlier this month, the mission was "aborted at the last minute after top Bush administration officials decided it was too risky and could jeopardize relations with Pakistan, according to intelligence and military officials."

In many ways, the speech is counterintuitive; Obama, one of the more liberal candidates in the race, is proposing a geopolitical posture that is more aggressive than that of President Bush. It comes at a time in Obama's campaign when the freshman senator is drawing more financial support from more voters than any other candidate, though he has yet to vault from his second-place position in the polls.

One of the reasons for that is that the Democratic front-runner, New York Sen. Hillary Clinton, is seen as more experienced and in some ways stronger, a perspective Obama wishes to change.

The speech, delivered at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington, D.C., seems an attempt by Obama to ramp up his campaign to the next phase, where he hopes to seem not only a youthful idealist, but a president who would pursue a muscular foreign policy and protect the United States from terrorist attack.

Pakistan is one of five elements he called for in his speech. The other four are improving diplomacy for the purpose of counterterrorism and counterproliferation; creating a $5 billion Shared Security Partnership Program that he will say will "forge an international intelligence and law enforcement infrastructure to take down terrorist networks around the globe; restoring our values; and securing a more resilient homeland."

Obama, whose father was Muslim, makes clear that he does not share the views of Democrats who downplay the risk of Islamist terrorism. In language rare for a Democratic presidential candidate, Obama talked about Muslims who seek to create a repressive caliphate. "To defeat this enemy, we must understand who we are fighting against, and what we are fighting for."

© 2008 ABC News Internet Ventures

And:

In addition to his call for an attack on Pakistan, Obama has also demanded the addition of 93,000 more combat troops to the permanent US regular army. This demand puts him in the company of the some of the most extreme hawks. Obama stated: "To defeat al Qaeda, I will build a twenty-first-century military and twenty-first-century partnership as strong as the anticommunist alliance that won the Cold War to stay on the offense everywhere from Djibouti to Kandahar." Barack Obama (Fred Hiatt "Stay-the-Course Plus: Obama, Romney and Foreign Engagement on Steroids," Washington Post, June 4, 2007.

And then there’s the whole tinfoil zone (not going there, don't need to)with Ilyas Akhmadov ?? (hint):

Matthew Brzezinski, "How a Chechen terror suspect wound up living on taxpayers' dollars near the National Zoo," Washington Post, March 20, 2005

Fvck these clowns

I think he is brilliant and usually well spoken. He has been in politics for decades and has already had a previous stint in the white house (I‘m sure your aware of don‘t get me started on that failure). There’s no doubt about it Opie, upon initial examination he’s a great guy. Closer look reveals a murkier glass of water (I believe).
 

LordOpie

MOTHER HEN
Oct 17, 2002
21,033
1
Denver
Thanks for that.

I'm clearly not informed enough and I'm continuing to research stuff (not that it matters to anyone but me).

Like, I know nothing about Ilyas Akhmadov. Can you give some insight into him and how his background relates to Obama?
 

3D.

Monkey
Feb 23, 2006
899
0
Chinafornia USA
Thanks for that.

I'm clearly not informed enough and I'm continuing to research stuff (not that it matters to anyone but me).

Like, I know nothing about Ilyas Akhmadov. Can you give some insight into him and how his background relates to Obama?

I'm on a constant quest to no more and I like to be proven wrong, then I'll know I'm right

Akhmadov’s Long story short… we granted him political asylum from Russia in 2003. He was the foreign minister and ambassador for the Chechen rebel terrorist group that was responsible for a 300 person schoolyard massacre in Russia (mostly women & children) and all sorts of other crap. Russia wants him… we have him on payroll in DC… Zbig brought him here.

But, like I said I wasn’t going to harp on the spy games stuff. His other policies are enough. There‘s also interviews like this that make me run:
Brzezinski: ... According to the official version of history, CIA aid to the Mujahadeen began during 1980, that is to say, after the Soviet army invaded Afghanistan, 24 Dec 1979. But the reality, secretly guarded until now, is completely otherwise: Indeed, it was July 3, 1979 that President Carter signed the first directive for secret aid to the opponents of the pro-Soviet regime in Kabul. And that very day, I wrote a note to the president in which I explained to him that in my opinion this aid was going to induce a Soviet military intervention.

Q: Despite this risk, you were an advocate of this covert action. But perhaps you yourself desired this Soviet entry into war and looked to provoke it?

B: It isn't quite that. We didn't push the Russians to intervene, but we knowingly increased the probability that they would.

Q: When the Soviets justified their intervention by asserting that they intended to fight against a secret involvement of the United States in Afghanistan, people didn't believe them. However, there was a basis of truth. You don't regret anything today?

B: Regret what? That secret operation was an excellent idea. It had the effect of drawing the Russians into the Afghan trap and you want me to regret it? The day that the Soviets officially crossed the border, I wrote to President Carter: We now have the opportunity of giving to the USSR its Vietnam war. Indeed, for almost 10 years, Moscow had to carry on a war unsupportable by the government, a conflict that brought about the demoralization and finally the breakup of the Soviet empire.

Q: And neither do you regret having supported the Islamic fundamentalists, having given arms and advice to future terrorists?

B: What is most important to the history of the world? The Taliban or the collapse of the Soviet empire? Some stirred-up Moslems or the liberation of Central Europe and the end of the cold war?

Q: Some stirred-up Moslems? But it has been said and repeated: Islamic fundamentalism represents a world menace today.

B: Nonsense!

(Nouvel Observateur, January 15-21, 1998)


I’ve heard Zbig state on numerous occasions, that the course we are headed on in Iraq is the wrong one… not that he likes the idea of a peaceful resolution.

I think Zbig’s current agendas speak for themselves, behind the scenes, who know’s? that’s why I’m staying away