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hardrock single speed?

make it a single speed?

  • yes

    Votes: 10 83.3%
  • no

    Votes: 2 16.7%

  • Total voters
    12
Aug 15, 2005
253
0
Berlin, CT
My dad just bought a new bike, so we have his '99 rigid specialized hardrock. I was wondering if it would make a good single speed. the complete bike weighs in around 30lbs as is. it would drop if i got my hands on it.

so, would it make a good single speed? and how should i make it a single speed? (what components?)
 

Angus

Jack Ass Pen Goo Win
Oct 15, 2004
1,478
0
South Bend
The best ways cost a little more than going with spacers or tensioners.
The hard rockis a decent donor frame that you can do this to
Frame conversion

Or you can score a good deal on one of these frames while there still around (if these came in a 29er I'd have one)
853 EBB

If that's too pricey I highly recomend building a rear wheel with and Eno hub. This is a nice hub that has an eccentric axle to allow proper chain adjustment.
ENO HUB

or you can go the spacer route which isn't for me, but several people have success with it, and finally there are tensioners which I think just plain suck..........
 

Palilla

Monkey
Jul 20, 2004
102
0
MunkeeHucker said:
The best ways cost a little more than going with spacers or tensioners.


or you can go the spacer route which isn't for me, but several people have success with it, and finally there are tensioners which I think just plain suck..........

:rolleyes: I'm not exactly sure what he is talking about but you can make that bike into a singlespeed fairly easy, and you will need spacers and a tensioner. Those years the Hardrock frames were chromoly which is a plus.

A cheap, easy method:

I'm not 100% sure of the crank, but i think it was the specialized strongarms, which you can break down easily (unlike some cheaper cranks from that time that you couldn't take the spiders apart easily).

1. Remove the rear derialluer. Remove the chainrings, and either keep the middle one, or buy singlespeed chainring (best idea)...Truvativ/Evil/Blackspire/Salsa/Surly all make them. Once you have a the new chainwheel (or old middle one) attach it to the spider with 6mm chainring bolts for single chainrings(The ones you used to remove them are larger, 9mm for double chainrings.)



2. Remove the rear cog and replace with a single cassette cog you purchased in desired tooth count, there are a bunch of these but Chris King and Surly make nice ones with a wide base. Then space it on the driveshell with cassette spacers (you'll need to buy some extra because the ones from your cog won't be enough). Make sure it is spaced so the rear cassette cogs lines up with the front chainwheel.

cassette cog


spacer



3. Install a chain tensioner in place of your rear derailleur.



I'd also recommend installing a new chain, like a SRAM 8-speed. Just member to make sure your chainline is straight and you tensioner is installed properly and your good to go :thumb:
 
Feb 25, 2005
274
0
seattle, wa
Has anyone ever considered just removing your derailluers and everything that goes with them calling it good and go ride? Keep you cog set intact and use the extra cogs as spacers and you also have options on what gearing you want to run. I did this on both my mountain and road bikes and have never had a problem (although they both do have horiz. dropouts which help). I did end up putting a tug style tensioner on my mountain bike though.
The even cheaper and less time consuming option would be to just not shift!
 

Palilla

Monkey
Jul 20, 2004
102
0
Never tried it, but I can't imagine that it would be good for your chain or gears choosing gear combo's that didn't produce a straight chainline. You might be alright for the gear that lines up straight with whatever chainring your using, but anything else I can't imagine would stay on. Plus if you wanted to change the gearing, you'd have to break the chain every time and add or remove links.
 
Feb 25, 2005
274
0
seattle, wa
Yeah, you do need to keep your chain line straight and your also right about adding and removing links to find that sweet spot. But I sure is easy and cheap. Which is what I'm all about.
 

crazybiker300

Monkey
Sep 20, 2005
114
0
they definately make a good budget SS. i had my old HR comp frame kickin around and converted it. i loved it.
 

bluebike

Chimp
Dec 14, 2004
9
0
i have a hardrock single speed built for park and street. if you use a 44 - 18 gear combination and a gusset 1r ss conversion kit ($21) you dont need a chain tensioner. :-) its a little slow, but still tons of fun for play. Ditch the front brake and loose the crappy fork and grind off all the cable guides and throw on some hookworms from maxxis and find a good deal on a 5" fork on ebay

good luck

i'm still using the OE crank set w/ a bashguard.