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Penalty for Drunkeness?

Da Peach

Outwitted by a rodent
Jul 2, 2002
12,626
1,996
North Van
So, I currently work on a large construction site.

A couple weeks ago, my superintendant showed up reeking of booze and acting weird. He was obviously drunk, and he was sent home for the day. We was back the next day, sober.

What would be the consequences of showing up drunk at your workplace?
 

stosh

Darth Bailer
Jul 20, 2001
21,988
154
NY
We have liquor in our office.
There is some beer in the fridge as well. One guy openly speaks about drinking his Johnny Walker Black when he works late.

Actually being drunk at work is a whole different story.
 

Westy

the teste
Nov 22, 2002
36,623
3,441
Sleazattle
Official policy is that the first time we get a warning.
Second time we are required to attend counseling.
Third time we get a permanend unpaid vacation.

Reality is the first time you get caught they start looking for a reason to fire you and they always find a reason to fire you.
 

ire

Turbo Monkey
Aug 6, 2007
6,199
4
Where I work it would be instant termination.
They actually can get sued for that. Under the Americans with Disabilities Act, being an alcoholic is a disability. They have to give you the chance to get cleaned up before they can fire you
 

stinkyboy

Plastic Santa
Jan 6, 2005
15,192
0
¡Phoenix!
There's tons of booze here, but it's unspoken that you wait until the end of the day, or if there's a celebration.

Doing shots at 10 am would prolly be frowned upon.
 

DirtyMike

Turbo Fluffer
Aug 8, 2005
14,288
874
My own world inside my head
They actually can get sued for that. Under the Americans with Disabilities Act, being an alcoholic is a disability. They have to give you the chance to get cleaned up before they can fire you
At my work, you get an instant one month suspension, and you are offered the opportnunity to go to AA. If you refuse, your fired. You miss one meeting, your fired, refuse rehab, your fired. Very non tolerant.
 

Wumpus

makes avatars better
Dec 25, 2003
8,164
154
Six Shooter Junction
At my work, you get an instant one month suspension, and you are offered the opportnunity to go to AA. If you refuse, your fired. You miss one meeting, your fired, refuse rehab, your fired. Very non tolerant.
How do they know if you miss a meeting of Alcoholics Anonymous?
 

MTBstud12

Monkey
Jan 24, 2008
484
0
Tejas
They actually can get sued for that. Under the Americans with Disabilities Act, being an alcoholic is a disability. They have to give you the chance to get cleaned up before they can fire you
Assuming you can prove you're an alcoholic. Not all people who show up drunk are "alcoholics".
 

Acadian

Born Again Newbie
Sep 5, 2001
716
2
Blah Blah and Blah
We have liquor in our office.
There is some beer in the fridge as well. One guy openly speaks about drinking his Johnny Walker Black when he works late.
same here...

current state of the fridge on our floors kitchen - cases are on the it since the fridge is already loaded :monkeydance:
 
There's tons of booze here, but it's unspoken that you wait until the end of the day, or if there's a celebration.

Doing shots at 10 am would prolly be frowned upon.
:stupid: Pretty close to the way we do it. Sitting in your office with a beer as quitting time approaches is not common, but neither would it be frowned upon and people seldom even do that. If we go out for lunch a beer is OK and when we have parties people's consumption is all over the map.
 

stevew

unique white person
Sep 21, 2001
31,768
2,691
So, I currently work on a large construction site.

A couple weeks ago, my superintendant showed up reeking of booze and acting weird. He was obviously drunk, and he was sent home for the day. We was back the next day, sober.

What would be the consequences of showing up drunk at your workplace?
When my brothers worked in construction in VA, it was not uncommon for people on the site to be drunk or under the influence of some type of drug. Electricians tripping on mushrooms/acid was commonplace.
 

skyst3alth

Monkey
Apr 13, 2004
866
0
Denver, CO
:stupid: Pretty close to the way we do it. Sitting in your office with a beer as quitting time approaches is not common, but neither would it be frowned upon and people seldom even do that. If we go out for lunch a beer is OK and when we have parties people's consumption is all over the map.
Same here, we have beer and alcohol in our office and when 4-4:30 rolls around the bosses are fine with us cracking one open. As long as we're not on the phone or expecting calls from a client.

The helpdesk guys have a bottle of whiskey under their desk that seems to have a little (lot) less in it every time i'm there. Can't really blame them, that job is miserable.
 

Reactor

Turbo Monkey
Apr 5, 2005
3,978
1
Chandler, AZ, USA
So, I currently work on a large construction site.

A couple weeks ago, my superintendant showed up reeking of booze and acting weird. He was obviously drunk, and he was sent home for the day. We was back the next day, sober.

What would be the consequences of showing up drunk at your workplace?
Where I work? Instant unconditional unemployment.
 

Reactor

Turbo Monkey
Apr 5, 2005
3,978
1
Chandler, AZ, USA
They actually can get sued for that. Under the Americans with Disabilities Act, being an alcoholic is a disability. They have to give you the chance to get cleaned up before they can fire you
Not where I work. Besides alcoholism is a disease, not a qualifying disability. Under ADA you are required to make reasonable accommodations, not put people's lives at risk. ADA doesn't include allowing a drunk to work on a construction site or run dangerous equipment.
 

ThePriceSeliger

Mushhead
Mar 31, 2004
4,861
0
Denver, Colorado
Lets see. At the Bike shop? It was common for someone to be under the influence. At the law firm, is was common for the attornys to drink a bit here and there, but there is no REAL boss there. At Cold Stone, it was frowned upon.
 

DirtyMike

Turbo Fluffer
Aug 8, 2005
14,288
874
My own world inside my head
I think you missed the catch there Mike. Wumpus highlighted anonymous. Get it...
I did notice, and was trying to say that if you end up in the situation of being caught drunk at work, to keep your job, first you end up at rehab, company paid, afterwords you are required to attend AA for at least a year. The owner makes arrangements with whoever your sponser is to make sure your going. Its part of the agreement made if you want to keep your job. But, Only the owner will be informed, noone else.
 

Serial Midget

Al Bundy
Jun 25, 2002
12,737
1,427
Fort of Rio Grande
I did notice, and was trying to say that if you end up in the situation of being caught drunk at work, to keep your job, first you end up at rehab, company paid, afterwords you are required to attend AA for at least a year. The owner makes arrangements with whoever your sponser is to make sure your going. Its part of the agreement made if you want to keep your job. But, Only the owner will be informed, noone else.
There is a problem there somewhere - if your employer does indeed follow this policy he is setting himself up for some pretty serious legal battles. He has no legal right to demand the information he is requiring as a condition of continued employment. Even if he does manage to gather this information he has NO LEGAL RIGHT to use it as a s basis for any decision he would make that will impact his employees.

I am no lawyer but... I don't think any employer has the legal right to form a contract which requires participation in AA or any other rehab program as a condition of continued employment.

First - being drunk at work does not equal alcoholism, making that leap by requiring participation as a condition of continued employment violates Federally protected employee rights.

Second - Participation in any rehab / recovery program does not guarantee results; failure to attend such programs does not mean the non-participant has reverted to the alleged addictive behavior.

Most companies have clearly defined policies that prohibit working under the influence of drugs and / or alcohol, it is the violation of these policies that are the basis for dismissal or continued employment. Employers have NO RIGHT or need to become involved in the private lives of their employees.

...or at least that's how it works down at the shoe shop. :)